Ayurvedic diet: a holistic approach to total beauty

Ayurvedic diet Ayurvedic diet: a holistic approach to total beauty

Detoxing, apart from losing weight, is also known for improving one’s skin through foods. It is during this detox period where people abstain from certain food and eat more of those that are highly beneficial to the body to efficiently cure any complexion problems. I was actually looking for detoxes for myself when I had acne problems and that’s how I came across this Ayurvedic diet. As I read and found out more, I believe an Ayurvedic diet is the equivalent of the Chinese concept of ‘heaty’ and ‘cooling’ foods.

What is an Ayurvedic diet
Ayurveda is a traditional holistic medicinal method passed down from India that is an entire way of life intended to balance your body using diet, exercise, meditation and herbal supplements. It uses the technique of re-establishing harmony within the body and at the same time, connecting the mind, body and soul as one. Unlike most Western medical disciplines, the Ayurveda diet method uses natural techniques and instead of treating the symptoms of the illness; it believes in treating the cause of it, making this a prevention for potential future occurrences as well.

The Ayurvedic philosophy
The Ayurveda philosophy is based on the way the universe is made up of these five elements – water, fire, earth, air, ether, and believes that most matter are made up of all five, but there will be one dominant element present. And that dominant elements will determine what kind of diet suits the body best. Using this guide, the human body is broken up into 3 metabolic types, otherwise known as Doshas, based on different element pairings. The 3 Doshas are,Vata, Kapha, and Pitta.

Types of Doshas
1. Vata is made up of the air and ether elements. Vata determines healthy motion and movement within the body such as: breathing, swallowing, circulation of blood, flow of nerve impulses to and from the brain, activities of digestive enzymes, urinary system and reproduction organs.

2. Kapha is made up of the earth and water elements. Kapha provides the body’s structure and lubrication, controlling fluid balance, production of phlegm and mucus, moistening foods in stomach and lubricating joints.

3. Pitta is made up of the fire and water elements and is the main anchor of the body as it is responsible for metabolism, digestion of food, maintaining body temperature, helping in memory and vision functions, and the condition of our outward complexion.

If you’re interested to find out your Dosha type, you can check out this online quiz.

Doshas Ayurvedic diet: a holistic approach to total beauty

Eat to balance harmony within the body
Apart from determining your body’s Dosha type, it is important that you eat the foods that are best suited for your type in order to continue balancing the harmony within your body. A person’s Dosha can shift and change depending on the location and conditions of the lifestyle, so people following the Ayurvedic diet have to be aware of small, subtle changes in their body from time to time. Partaking in some gentle and relaxing physical exercises is also recommended for people following the Ayurveda lifestyle, and yoga is the most popular of choice for most, especially since it derived from India.

Foods for different Doshas
Here are info to give you an idea of the diet plan according to Dosha types:

A Vata pacifying diet
Favors warm, cooked foods and hot beverages. Soft and oily foods, such as pasta, cooked cereals and soups should be favored over dry and crunchy foods. Raw vegetables should be avoided, except in small amounts. Avoid cold drinks and frozen desserts such as: ice cream, popsicles, frozen yogurt, etc (source).

A Kapha pacifying diet
Favors warm foods and hot beverages. Eat a minimum of oil and fat. Avoid cold drinks, cold food, and frozen desserts, such as: ice cream, popsicles, frozen yogurt, etc. Avoid leftovers, canned, bottled, or packaged foods, frozen foods, processed foods, rich, creamy foods, sweets, salty foods and alcohol. Eat mainly freshly prepared vegetable and legume dishes, with proportionately smaller amounts of grains and fruits. The food should be spiced according to taste (source).

A Pitta pacifying diet
Favors juicy, cooling foods with high water content while avoiding hot spices alcohol, vinegar, fried foods, tomatoes, yogurt and cheese. Foods should be fresh and organic, if possible. Avoid leftovers, packaged, canned or bottled foods, processed foods, preservatives, artificial ingredients and salty foods (source).

Concluding thoughts
I found this insightful and interesting as I have never heard or read about the Ayurvedic diet before. However, after doing a quiz in a book to determine my Dosha type, I looked at the foods that were recommended for me to follow and decided that this diet may not be one that I would eagerly participate in as it involves dairy. Anyone who knows me will know I avoid dairy like plague because it triggers my acne. While the Ayurvedic diet does not work for me, it works for some people, as even some celebrities are reported to be following this diet.  

So does this Ayurvedic diet get your interest? Is it something you will want to explore?

vivawoman1 Ayurvedic diet: a holistic approach to total beauty © www.vivawoman.net copyright notice
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About Cassie

Cassie is a strong advocate of eating and living healthy. Besides learning different ways of preparing healthy meals for herself and her spouse, she also enjoys reading and writing.

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Comments

  1. This is very interesting!! My mom was doing a dilopma in yoga few years back and yes, she did study all these Ayurvedic approaches and I kinda ‘studied’ along coz I need to help her preparing some assignments :P I also took the test to determine which dosha I am and after all this time I am still a Kapha *0* While it is all still very interesting, I still find myself relate to Traditional Chinese Medicine more ^^”
    Carrie last post is: We hold the key to our own happiness / 快樂只掌握在自己的手裡

    • There is a diploma in yoga?? Where did your mum take up that course? I am very intrigued by yoga lessons and am thinking of taking it up in the near future.
      Cassie last post is: The 7 ingredients I always avoid

      • It is a well-being tertiary institution in New Zealand (we have been living in NZ for a while now) ^^” not sure if Singapore also has a similar degree though! My mom has been practicing yoga for over 20 years!! Her body is pretty in shape and a lot of people cannot guess her age :P The reason she is taking the diploma is because she wanted to teach yoga here, and she did :)
        Carrie last post is: We hold the key to our own happiness / 快樂只掌握在自己的手裡

        • Ahh.. I thought there’s a diploma for yoga in Singapore. If you know of any places in Singapore that offers such course do let me know though! :D
          Cassie last post is: The 7 ingredients I always avoid

  2. my closest brush to ayurveda is following the advice of Deepak Chopra (on one of his books).. but I do have high respects for this traditional healing method… though I have been consulting TCM doctors for delayed menstruation, coughing (triggered by allergy)–and also considering accupuncture & TCM herbs to lose unwanted belly fat (Seriously considering in fact) . Eu Yan sang offers the program.
    Lanie last post is: Group Buy: FCLO (Fermented Cod Liver Oil) from Green Pastures

    • That’s interesting.. I’ve never thought of accupuncture being able to make one lose body fats. If you do try that let me know how it goes!
      Cassie last post is: The 7 ingredients I always avoid

  3. Cassie, is the JAMU (indonesian wrap) closely related to Ayurveda?
    Lanie last post is: Group Buy: FCLO (Fermented Cod Liver Oil) from Green Pastures

    • From what I know, I don’t think they are related because the Jamu massage originated from Balinese traditions while this Ayurvedic method is from India. But I get where you’re coming from as these two methods focus very much on the internal and external wellbeing of the patient.
      Cassie last post is: The 7 ingredients I always avoid

  4. Very interesting. I had heard of and experience ayurvedic massage but was not aware of a specific diet. Will certainly like to learn more and will head over to the test!
    Sylvia last post is: Dressing Your Truth course review and results

    • I’ve never experienced an ayurvedic massage before. Do update us on the outcome if you’ve decided to try this diet. :)
      Cassie last post is: The 7 ingredients I always avoid

  5. Hmmm, it says Your scores are Vata: 4 Pitta: 4 Kapha: 2
    Based on your results, you are a PITTA-VATA. Oh no, it seems to say I can’t have what I like. hahahaha. No cold, no strong flavors.

    The second quiz is good! I think it helps.
    Jyoan last post is: L’oreal Infallible Eyeshadows in Singapore!

    • Haha! I think it’s hard to avoid cold food and drinks in Singapore, especially since the weather is always humid.
      Cassie last post is: The 7 ingredients I always avoid

  6. Destiny7 says:

    If you ever get a chance, go see an Ayurvedic doctor who does pulse diagnosis. They can tell you amazing things about yourself just by touching your pulse for a minute and prescribe helpful herbs.

    • chenyze says:

      Where would you go to see an Ayurvedic doctor in Singapore though? I’ve tried researching in the past but couldn’t really find any.

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