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Can you use a diaper rash cream for your acne?

diaper cream for acne Can you use a diaper rash cream for your acne?

I love Zinc Oxide in my sunscreen as it provides the best broad spectrum protection against both UVA and UVB rays. However, besides serving as a great sunscreen ingredient, topical Zinc Oxide is great for wound treatment and even treatment of burns (source). Besides that, the ingredient is known to have minor astringent and antiseptic properties, and hence, is actually great for healing and protecting the skin, and this is why it is a key ingredient in diaper rash creams for babies. Interestingly, I also read that Zinc Oxide is great for treating acne, and some people are actually using diaper rash creams on their faces!

Hey what is this Azadirachta Indica in my product?

ingredient listing Hey what is this Azadirachta Indica in my product?

Some of you are probably well aware that Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice means Aloe Vera Leaf Gel, Simmondsia Chinensis Seed Oil is Jojoba Seed Oil, and Tocopherol is really Vitamin E in your skin care formulations. But what the heck is Azadirachta Indica, Cera Alba or Pterocarpus Santalinus Wood Extract? I don’t think that many of us know what they are unless we look them up or someone tells us their common names. So why aren’t the ingredients for most of our beauty products listed in understandable, commonly known names?

Would a baby wash cleanse me well enough?

A’kin PureBaby Softening Body Wash Shampoo Would a baby wash cleanse me well enough?

I’ve run out of my own body wash and resorted to using my son’s A’kin PureBaby Softening Body Wash & Shampoo for now. Although I have used baby washes to cleanse myself before, I still get occasional nagging thoughts that they do not cleanse me quite as well as body washes formulated for adults. To prove that I’m just being a tad paranoid, I took out the ingredient lists of the A’kin baby body wash and a standard A’kin body wash to compare and here’s what they show.

Carotenoids: oral & topical use of beta-carotenes

beta carotene Carotenoids: oral & topical use of beta carotenes

Carotenoids are a class of antioxidants that protect the skin from environmental stressors, in particular, from ultraviolet damage. There are hundreds of carotenoids, and this week, I’m going to share with you new stuff I’ve been using, both orally and topically under this family. Kicking off today, I’m going to introduce you to beta-carotenes, which are found in many fruits and vegetables such as carrots, peas, broccoli, pumpkins, peppers, spinach, green lettuces, and orange fruits like apricots, cantaloup melons, peaches, nectarines and papayas.